Noun Case

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Note: “at” can be used in many cases and means many things.

Nominative Genitive Dative Accusative Vocative
Subject
Predicate-Nominative
Possession
Origin
Approximation
Motion
Topic
Relation
Substance
Contents
Indirect-Object
Means
Method
Manner
Time
Location
Proximity
Direct-Object
Destination
Purpose
Addressee
(Naming
people
when
addressing
them)
of
from
(vi.) about
in
with
by
on
around
about [n.]
under
over
near
beneath
by
(v.) at [n.]
to
for
(vt.) at [O.]

Three English pronoun cases: nominative, oblique, genitive

Pronoun Cases (English)
Nominative Oblique Genitive
I
We
He
She
They
me
us
him
her
them
my/mine
our/ours
his/his
her/hers
their/theirs

Three merged cases: ablative (genitive); locative & instrumental (dative)

Genitive (merged)
Ablative vs Genitive
from Movement I came from town.
Get back from the stove.
Look away from the sun.
They flew in from Alaska.
Origin It’s [a gift] from me.
Is that from the fridge?
They’re from Europe.
Learn from your father.
Dative (merged)
Locative Instrumental
with
in
on
by
Location
Proximity
Time
about
at
near, etc.
She walked with her cousin.
You may talk with them.
I read in my office on the
floor by the window.
He paced about the room.
Can you finish in one hour?
Means
Method
Manner
Mom writes with a pen.
They drove with care.
He spoke in anger.
We talked on the phone.
They went by bus.
Solve by asking.

Note: “about” has many uses, but is always vaguely approximate.

about
adj./adv. Genitive
Direct-Object
Locative
Proximity
about [measured] (v.) of/about [topic/object] (v.) about [location]
about [midnight]
about [6 o’clock]
about [7 feet]
about [sea level]
about [eye level]
about [90%]
about [all I can take]
(talk) about
(write) about
(speak) about
(think) about
(learn) about
(inform) about
(advise) about
(run) about
(drive) about
(fly) about
(turn) about.
(BE) about.
out and about
around and about
approximately
around
roughly
close to
near
concerning
relating to
pertaining to
of/on
in connection to/with
around.
in and around
nearby
all over
in the vicinity of
It was about noon.
He is about 6 feet tall.
We flew about level
with the mountain.
They are about on time.
We talked about yesterday.
He informed us about the concert.
She spoke about medicine.
I will learn more about HTML.
You should think about that.
Don’t run about the house.
That bird has been flying
about the sky all day!
The ship turned about.
They are out and about.

Further Reading:
Wikipedia: Grammatical Case #Indo-European eight cases | #English
Syntax of natural language, Ch 8: Case theory, by Beatrice Santorini & Anthony Kroch